Better than salt money

Work like you were living in the early days of a better nation

A Bountiful Harvest

3 Comments

The fiber and whorl I ordered from Bountiful arrived yesterday.

The fiber is pretty.  It’s a bit less soft than the pure bay camel I have, but that was to be expected.  The whorl is TINY. It’s very pretty too (I like cherry).  This isn’t, per se, their doing (they didn’t make it, merely had the best price I’d seen).  But they are clever.  If you look at their website they have pages listing fiber.  Such lists are always a bit of strange pleasure, one can’t tell what they are (esp. things like, “Jacob”, as the source of some wool.  I am sure Jacob is a splendid beast, but that lets me know nothing of the condition of his wool).

With the printed catalog (all their drop spindles in one place, no need to poke about on six web pages [no, I didn’t spend much time looking in the nooks and crannies of the shop, why do you ask?] to see what they have), they included fiber samples.  Jacob, it turns out is a lovely shade of brown, not quite what I’d call chocolate; with a staple of about 5″.  Medium fine, and probably spins a very nice woolen, suitable for hats, or blending into something for a shawl.  Not suited to laceweight spinning.

It’s a very nice thing.  I am much more likely to order more fiber from them.

The whorl is nice.  It’s like changing gears on a bicycle. Not only does the flyer spin more quickly, it does so with less work.  I am now spinning as finely on the wheel as I am on a spindle.  I am quite pleased.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “A Bountiful Harvest

  1. Jacob sheep are totally awesome. They have four horns. (http://albc-usa.org/cpl/jacob.html has pictures, and also a brief description of their wool.)

    Presumably the retailer’s assuming that their customers are already familiar with the fleece of the various breeds of sheep, but yeah, a handy guide would be nice. Particularly with something like the Jacob, which is a breed so rare it’s endangered.

  2. Jacob isn’t (in this case) a breed of sheep, but a specific alpaca.

  3. Aha! Learn something every day. Thank you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s